Share
How To Quickly Rid Yourself Of Acid Reflux

How To Quickly Rid Yourself Of Acid Reflux




If you have concerns about acid reflux, here are some tips that will help you. There are lots of medications and natural remedies for acid reflux. Reading this article will teach you what to do.

Acid reflux could be the sign of something worse
Acid reflux could be the sign of something worse

Enjoy your food. If you savor each bite, investigating the flavors and truly allowing yourself to taste it, you will chew more and even eat less. Your stomach will realize it’s full when you eat slowly, which allows you to keep your weight in check by eating less and also keep your stomach from overfilling.

Limit your liquid intake with meals if you’re prone to acid reflux. Even healthy beverages like water can fill up your stomach fast, creating conditions that are conducive to acid reflux. Sip your beverage conservatively and never gulp it down. Wait a half an hour after a big meal to enjoy quenching your thirst.

Always keep gravity in mind. Remember that acid is being held down, so when you position your body in a way where down isn’t towards your feet, problems will ensue. Keep your head up and your stomach uncompressed, then you should be able to find relief from acid reflux all day long.

Don’t drink alcohol if you are trying to treat symptoms of acid reflux. The effects of alcohol actually work to relax the muscles in your esophagus, which worsens reflux. Consider what you are eating, how you are eating and if you’ve got too much stress in your life as possible reasons for frequent acid reflux and change them before reaching for your next drink.

If you suffer from reflux, smoking can cause serious problems. The nicotine in cigarettes creates acid in the stomach, causing acid reflux. Quitting cold turkey can cause stress and worsen your symptoms. Gradually quit.

Loosen up if you’ve been dealing with too much acid reflux. Your clothing, that is. Tight pants, close-fitting shirts or pantyhose can make symptoms of acid reflux much worse. If you can, put a robe on or other over-sized and very comfy clothes and take it easy. Your symptoms should at least be somewhat alleviated.

Sometimes, you will have extreme cases of acid reflux, even to the point where you think you are having a heart attack. Don’t ever make the mistake of ignoring serious pain in your chest. You may be experiencing a heart attack. Call your doctor immediately to find out what to do. By misdiagnosing yourself, never risk complications or death.

Limit the amount of fluids you intake while eating. Fluids add volume to the food you are eating, which will result in overfilling your stomach and allowing stomach acids to rise into your esophagus resulting in acid reflux. By limiting the amount of fluids you ingest, you can help prevent acid reflux.

Elevate the headboard of your bed. You can lift up the bed by using bricks, wood or raisers specifically made for raising a bed. Aim to have the head of the bed six inches higher when compared to the foot. If you elevate your chest and head, you could stop the rise of stomach acid while you sleep.

ACID REFLUX is an epidemic affecting as many as 40 percent of Americans. In addition to heartburn and indigestion, reflux symptoms may include postnasal drip, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, chronic throat clearing, coughing and asthma. Taken together, sales of prescribed and over-the-counter anti-reflux medications exceed $13 billion per year.

The number of people with acid reflux has grown significantly in recent decades. Reflux can lead to esophageal cancer, which has increased by about 500 percent since the 1970s. And anti-reflux medication alone does not appear to control reflux disease. A Danish study published this year concluded that there were no cancer-protective effects from using the common anti-reflux medications, called proton pump inhibitors, and that regular long-term use was actually associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal cancer.

What is responsible for these disturbing developments? The answer is our poor diet, with its huge increases in the consumption of sugar, soft drinks, fat and processed foods. But there is another important variable that has been underappreciated and overlooked: our dinnertime.

I specialize in the diagnosis and management of acid reflux, especially airway reflux, which affects the throat, sinuses and lungs. Airway reflux is often “silent,” occurring without telltale digestive symptoms, like heartburn and indigestion. Most of the tens of thousands of reflux patients that I have seen over the last 35 years are well today because I treat reflux by modifying my patients’ diets and lifestyles.

Over the past two decades, I’ve noticed that the time of the evening meal has been trending later and later among my patients. The after-work meal — already later because of longer work hours — is often further delayed by activities such as shopping and exercise.

Typical was the restaurateur who came to see me with symptoms of postnasal drip, sinus disease, hoarseness, heartburn and a chronic cough. He reported that he always left his restaurant at 11 p.m., and after arriving home would eat dinner and then go to bed. There was no medical treatment for this patient, no pills or even surgery to fix his condition. The drugs we are using to treat reflux don’t always work, and even when they do, they can have dangerous side effects. My patient’s reflux was a lifestyle problem. I told him he had to eat dinner before 7 p.m., and not eat at all after work. Within six weeks, his reflux was gone.

In my experience, the single most important intervention is to eliminate late eating, which in the United States is often combined with portions of large, over-processed, fatty food. Europeans have fewer cases of reflux than we do, even though many of them eat late. That’s most likely from portion control. In France, for example, a serving of ice cream is typically a single modest scoop, while in America, it’s often three gargantuan scoops.

For my patients, eating late is often accompanied by overeating, because many skip breakfast and eat only a sandwich at lunch. Thus the evening meal becomes the largest meal of the day. After that heavy meal, it’s off to the sofa to watch television. After eating, it’s important to stay upright because gravity helps keep the contents in the stomach. Reflux is the result of acid spilling out of the stomach, and lying down with a full stomach makes reflux much more likely.

And if you add an after-dinner dessert or bedtime snack? Again, reflux is a natural consequence. In a healthy young person, the stomach normally takes a few hours to empty after a moderate-size meal. In older people or those who have reflux, gastric emptying is often delayed. Further, those dessert calories tend to be high in carbohydrates and fat, and high-fat foods often create reflux by slowing digestion and relaxing the stomach valve that normally prevents reflux. Other popular but notoriously bad-for-nighttime-reflux foods and beverages are mints, chocolate, soft drinks and alcohol.

Do you think you can now take control of your acid reflux? You have all the knowledge you need now, so you should be ready. Take end and control your suffering.

Source Below New York Times

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestDigg this